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Become Certified as a

Christian Domestic Violence Specialist

 

Training and Certification offered through joint venture of:

Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Institute

&

The American Association of Christian Therapists (AACT)

 
Dear Prospective Domestic Violence Specialist

         

Jubilee Enterprises &

the American Association of Christian Therapists

Are pleased to announce a cooperative program

for the training and certification of

Christian Domestic Violence Specialists

Who are trained in, and employ, an integrative,

 biopsychosociospiritual approach to

personhood wholeness and family restoration

 

The first step in determining whether certification as a Domestic Violence Specialist is right for you lies in gaining a first hand understanding of the nature and scope of the problem, the opportunities, roles and duties thereof. Work in this area is both rewarding and demanding. In developing this understanding, it is essential to separate research from rhetoric, fact from fiction, and pragmatic exactness from political correctness.

 

The domestic violence statistics promulgated during the past few years indicate that family abuse and violence is basically an issue of gender differences in power and control, featuring male perpetrators and female victims. Typical statistical reports published by women advocacy groups include the following:

 

Nearly one-third of women will be abused by their intimate partner.

 

Violence inflicted by an intimate partner accounts for approximately 21% of all violence suffered by women and only about 2% of all violence suffered by men.

 

Roughly 92% of all domestic violence incidents involve crimes against women by men.

 

Approximately 28% of all female homicide victims are killed by their male partners while just over 3% of males are killed by their female partners.

 

Women are attacked six times more often than males in incidents of intimate violence.

 

We have become so accustomed to hearing these and similar statistics that few of us ever take time to question their validity. But, to understand the problem, it is essential to momentarily set aside these familiar statistics and our preconceived ideas, in order to examine current research findings. Following are selected exerts from recent research articles as reported in an annotated bibliography on the subject prepared by Martin S. Fiebert, Department of Psychology, California State University, Long Beach. The referenced bibliography examines 155 scholarly research articles; 126 empirical studies and 29 literature reviews or analyses. The aggregate sample size in the reviewed studies exceeds 116,000. For more details the reader is recommended to refer to the entire annotated bibliography @ http://www.csulb.edu/mfiegert/assault.htm.

 

A sample of actively dating college students -- 204 females and 140 males -- responding to a survey examining courtship violence indicated that there were no significant differences between the genders in self-reported perpetration of violence. Aizenman, M., & Kelly, G. (1988).

Meta-analyses of gender differences in agressivity between heterosexual partners indicate that women are more likely than men to use acts of violence, and to use such acts in greater frequency. In terms of injuries sustained, women were more likely to suffer injuries, analyses indicating that 62% of those injured were women. Archer, J. (2000), Psychological Bulletin, 126, 651-680.

 

Analyzing responses to a “Conflict Tactics Scale, women are more likely than men to throw things at their partner, as well as to slap, kick, bite, punch and hit with objects, while men are more likely to strangle, choke or beat up their partners. Archer, J. (2002).

 

Of those completing the Conflict Tactics Scale, women were significantly more likely than their male partners to express their violence physically. Archer, J. & Ray, N. (1989), Aggressive Behavior, 15, 337-343.

 

Using the Conflict Tactics Scale with a sample of 270 undergraduates -- 95 men and 175 women -- researchers found that 30% of men and 49% of women reported using aggression during their dating history with a greater percentage of women engaging in severe physical aggression. Arias, I, Samios, M & O’Leary, K. D. (1987)

 

In another study employing this scale with a sample of 103 males and 99 females, 19% of women and 18% of men admitted being physically aggressive with their partners. Arias I, & Johnson P. (1989).

 

A study in “Violent Intimacy” surveying 461 college students, found that 15% of the men and 21% of the women acknowledged physically abusing their partners. Bernard, M. L. & Bernard, J. L. (1983).

 

The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry (31, 129-137) reporting on a survey among 1,200 randomly selected Canadians, that women both initiated and engaged in violence at higher rates than their male partners. Bland, R. & Orne, H. (1986).

 

While most violence in relationships appears to be mutual -- 36% reported by women and 38% by men -- women report initiating violence with their nonviolent male partners more frequently than men with their female partners (22% vs. 17%). Bookwala, J., Frieze I. H., Smith, C. & Ryan K. (1992).

 

A large national study involving only married couples, employing the Conflict Tactics Scale, found that women engage in about the same amount of spousal abuse and violence as men. Brush, L. D. (1990).

 

In a community wide sample of at-risk young couples, employing the Conflict Tactics Scale, reported these gender comparisons: 9.4% of men and 13.2% of women perpetrated frequent acts of physical violence against their partner. And, contrary to what was expected, 13% of the men and 9% of the women indicated they had been physically injured at least once, while 2% of the men and none of the women indicated that they had been injured by their partner between five and nine times. Capaldi, D. M. & Owen, L. D. (2001).

 

While most domestic violence literature being promulgated today portrays women as the “recipients of domestic violence -- epidemiological surveys on the distribution of violent behavior between adult partners suggest gender parity.” Coney, N. S. & Mackey, W. C. (1999).

 

Contrary to the frequently touted assertions that certain minority ethnicities practice more domestic violence than others, research indicates otherwise. A sample involving 1440 couples -- 565 white, 358 black and 527 Hispanic, indicates that the overall incidence of aggression and violence is similar for all ethnicities. In terms of gender, white men and women demonstrated a parity of partner aggression, while Hispanic women were more aggressive than their male partners, and black men were more aggressive than black women. Cunradi, C. B., Caetano, R., Clark, C. L. & Schafer, J. (1999).

 

When domestic violence is not reciprocal, or mutual, men were three times more likely than women to report being victimized, and violence in past relationships was the best overall predictor of violence in current relationships. Deal, J. E. & Wampler, K. S. (1986).

 

When one partner could be labeled as the usual initiator, or primary aggressor, of violence in a relationship, that partner is most frequently the woman -- regardless of race. DeMaris, A, (1992).

 

One study found that women were more likely to act out aggressively in relationships than men because they don’t believe their male partners will be injured or retaliate. Women also claim that they assault their male partners because they want their attention and involvement, particularly emotional. Feibert, M. S., & Gonzales, D. M. (1997).

 

Gender differences are also evident in aggression motivation. In a broad base study, women were found to be twice as likely to report having perpetrated violence as men and women attribute their male partner’s violence to a desire to gain control or retaliate for having been hit first. In contrast, most men believe that female aggression emanates from a female’s desire to demonstrate just how angry they are, thereby retaliating for feeling emotionally mistreated. Follingstad, D. R.. Wright, S., & Sebastin, J. A. (1991).

 

One of the more renowned researchers in the field, R. J. Gelles, laments the complete lack of objectivity on the part of the “feminists” concerning research demonstrating female perpetrated domestic violence. Gelles, R. J. (1994).

 

A study of domestic violence in the United Kingdom found that the single highest at-risk group for being victimized in domestic violence incidents are single men, abused by their partners or former partners. George, M. J. (1999).

 

A research project surveying adolescent dating violence found that mutual combat was present in 66% of the cases and when there was a clear perpetrator, or primary aggressor, 29% of the women and 4% of the men reported being the sole perpetrator, while 8% of the women and 26% of the men reported being the victim of intimate violence. Gray, H. M., & Foshee, V. (1997).

 

The rate of severe violence of husbands against wives decreased 33% from 1975 to 1985, while the rate of severe violence of wives against husbands increased 42% during that same period. Hampton, R. L., Gelles, R. J., & Harrop, J. W. (1989).

 

A reexamination of the data from the current National Violence Against Women survey (Tjaden & Thoennes, 1998) indicates that “assaulted men are more likely than assaulted women to experience serious attacks by being hit with an object, beat up, threatened with a knife or being knifed.” Hoff, B. H. (1999).

 

A study in the Journal of Family Violence reported that 25% of husbands and 11% of wives could be identified as being mildly aggressive while 53% of wives and 36% of husbands could be classified as being severely aggressive. Moreover, 68% of the couples surveyed were in agreement on the gender specificity of aggression in their relationship. Langhinrichsen-Rohling, J., & Vivian, D. (1994).

 

An examination of domestic violence based on an analysis of official data and national victimization, as reported in the Justice Quarterly, 1, 171-193, reviewing 6,200 cases of spousal abuse in the Detroit Michigan area, found that men had used a weapon 25% of the time while female assailants used weapons 86% of the time. McLeod, M. (1984).

 

A ten year study in the United States, culminating in 1989, found higher murder rates of wives than husbands -- 43.4% vs. 56.6%. Black husbands were at the greatest risk of victimization, and homicide rates among interracial marriages was 7.7 times higher. Husbands and wives were equally likely to be killed by firearms -- about 72% of the time -- while husbands were more likely to be stabbed while wives were more likely to be bludgeoned to death. Mercy J. A. & Saltzman, L. E. (1989).

 

A broad based study conducted in six different countries, including the United States, found that in all societies, the percentage of husbands who used violence was similar to the percentage of  violent wives. The major exception noted was that “wives who used violence . . . tended to use greater amounts.” Stets, J. E. & Henderson, D. A. (1991).

 

Contrary to a popular notion about women’s violence against men, researchers have concluded that the violence perpetrated by women is not primarily defensive in nature. Stets, J. E. & Strass, M. A. (1990).

 

A feminist analysis of the problem, published in the Psychology of Women Quarterly, 18, 487-508, acknowledges that “women equal or exceed men in number of reported aggressive acts committed within the family.” White, J. W., & Kowalski, R. M. (1994).

 

And, despite the popularly promulgated statistics on spousal homicide, an article published in Criminology, 30, 189-215, indicates that for every 100 men who kill their wives, about 75 wives killed their husbands. Wilson, M. I. & Daley, M. (1992). [With the current trend involving a reduction in the incidence of violent acts of men against women and a corresponding increase in the incidence of violent acts of women against men, the gender ratio in spousal homicide is nearly equal.]

 

Children are also at risk and are frequently victims in family violence. The Heritage Foundation reports that an average of six (6) children die as a result of domestic violence each day. This equals nearly 2,000 per year. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the perpetrator in these child deaths is disturbing. The Heritage Foundation reports estimates that 1,100 of these children are killed by their mothers compared to only 137 by their biological father! Stepfathers account for an estimated 250 of these deaths and live-in boyfriends are responsible for 513. This means that nearly 81% of children killed in family violence incidents are killed by their own mothers and/or their mother’s live-in boyfriend.

 

The purpose in providing this information is not to indicte women and exonerate men, but rather to uncover truth in hopes of improving society’s response to domestic violence.  Hopefully, the citations provided above have pierced the veil of political correctness that has been erected to shroud the truth: that domestic violence is a human issue rather than a gender issue. Research indicates that nearly 95% of all domestic violence is expressive violence as compared with instrumental violence. That is to say that most violence is an aberrant expression of one’s emotions rather than an intentional and instrumental use of power and control to hurt, control and/or punish.

 

Associated with our misunderstanding of the problem, is our inappropriate and ineffective response as peace officers, the judiciary and society in general. The typical response has been to vilify the male and identify as a victim the female. This conceptualization of the problem has resulted in a typical scenario where the father and husband -- usually the primary income generator -- is removed from the home and incarcerated while the wife and mother is subjected to undue financial hardship. This serves to contribute to undue stress resulting in the development of other relationships that might help meet her financial needs, with the end result being an alarming increase in child abuse and fatality -- instigated by both mother and boyfriend. Moreover, there are numerous other outcomes of this mishandling of the problem, as indicated in the following statistics:

 

63% of all youth suicides are from fatherless homes (Bureau of the Census).

 

90% of all homeless and runaway children are from fatherless homes.

 

85% of all children that exhibit behavioral disorders come from fatherless homes (Center for Disease Control).

 

80% of rapists motivated by displaced anger come from fatherless homes (Criminal Justice & Behavior, Vol. 14. P. 403-416, 1978).

 

71% of all high school dropouts come from fatherless homes (National Principals Association Report on the State of High Schools).

 

75% of all adolescent patients in chemical abuse/dependency treatment centers come from fatherless homes (Rainbows for all God’s Children).

 

70% of all juveniles in state-operated mental health institutions come from fatherless homes (U.S. Department of Justice, special Report, Sept. 1988).

 

85% of all youths sitting in prisons grew up in a fatherless home (Fulton Co., Georgia - Jail Populations, Texas Department of Corrections, 1992)

 

To correct this historic misunderstanding that has guided decades of ineffective policy and procedure development, prevention and treatment; Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a., AFS Family Skills Institute, has developed and clinically tested an anger-management/batterers’ intervention technique that is based on sound research and clinical experience rather than rhetoric and political correctness. This program, the “Save Our Families” Program has a proven recidivism rate of less than 10% in the first year following treatment to clinical discharge. This compares with the average recidivism of 50% claimed by some of the more prominent, well known domestic violence and abuse prevention and treatment programs.

 

Recognizing the importance of treatment outcomes, and knowing experientially that better outcomes are possible, the AFS Family Skills Institute began an aggressive training program to equip other Christian counselors to: effectively treat perpetrators and victims of family abuse and violence; participate in policy and procedure development; conduct public awareness, education and prevention programs; and advocate for appropriate change at the legislative, judiciary and regulatory levels. This effort, once developed and replicated through other trained counselors, led to the need for more specific recognition through certification. To effect this, Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Institute, has partnered with the A.A.C.T., the American Association of Christian Therapists, to provide systematic training and professional certification of Christian Domestic Violence Specialists. 

 

The American Association of Christian Therapists, or  A.A.C.T. For short, is an inclusive organization of Christian counselors and therapists certified at various levels of expertise.  AACT seeks to offer an opportunity for membership, commensurate to each individual’s education, training, and experience. In the way the credentialing levels have been structured, we have sought to maintain quality and integrity regarding qualifications, while respecting, and providing for, those who are in the process of obtaining requisite skills in the fields of pastoral counseling and/or Christian counseling and therapy.

 

The A.A.C.T. is a conservative but multidisciplinary group, with a firm belief that there can be “unity through diversity” within the body of Christ, and within the Christian counseling community. This diversity is reflected in our respect for differing models of Christian worship, service, counseling and therapy, and in the unique manner God has gifted each of us as ministers.  Our unity is represented in our end purpose and goals. These goals include offering a means for counseling training for pastors, and sound, integrative theological/ psychological training for Christian therapists. This will better equip Christian therapists to assist clients in their desire to experience the abundant life the Lord has offered them, and to facilitate the removal of the “roadblocks” that inhibit their ability to be all that God is calling them to be.

 

Whether you are a member of the body of Christ seeking training for a lay counseling ministry, a student pursuing training in ministry, counseling or a combination thereof, a church pastor desiring to expand your counseling skills, a chaplain, a pastoral counselor, or a Christian who is a state licensed therapist, or one seeking licensure, the A.A.C.T. has a place for you.  In addition to the credentialing process, we offer an interactive e-mail group, a membership directory for referrals, training, fellowship, and information on beginning a counseling ministry. The AACT ties to Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. The AFS Family Skills Institute, and the Institute of Theology and Christian Therapy (I.T.C.T.) provide you opportunities for career development training; college degrees; and continuing education -- all at and affordable cost. Finally, our relationship with churches and ministries, such as the Evangelical Christian Church (E.C.C.), offers qualified individuals the opportunity for ministerial licensing or ordination for pastoral counseling.

 

We welcome you to join our growing group, pursue your career goals through expert training, and gain the recognition you deserve through professional testing and certification.

 
 
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Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist

 

Job Description

A Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist is an individual specially qualified in integrative, biopsychospiritual therapy through specific training and experience to provide the following professional services:

 

Batterers’ Intervention Treatment

Client advocacy

Community Education and Awareness

 

Counselor / Facilitator Training

Christian and Chaplaincy Training and Supervision

Domestic Violence Prevention Services

 

Domestic Violence Abatement Training

Domestic Violence Counseling for Offenders and Victims

Education of the public, policy-makers and the judiciary on the subject

 

Expert witness testimony before the courts and legislative bodies

Policy, procedure and regulation development and promulgation

Political action related to the profession

 

Employment Opportunities

Employment opportunities for Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialists are subject to verifiable training and experience in the profession, and such opportunities include:

 

Public and quasi-public agencies, including but not limited to:

 

Chaplaincy Services in Military and Federal and State facilities

Child Protective Services

Churches, Synagogues and Temples of all faiths

 

Health and Human Services

Hospitals and clinics

Legislative councils

Probation and Parole Departments

 

Schools

Social Services

The courts and associated judiciary offices

Victim Witness Services

 

Private Commerce and Industry, including but not limited to:

 

Client Counselor and Facilitator services in various agencies and organizations

Educational opportunities in schools, colleges, universities and training institutes

Employment Assistance Programs

Ministerial Positions

Private practice

Recovery and Rehabilitation Programs

School and Vocational Counseling

 

Certification Requirements

Certification in the profession is offered at four levels, each level of certification based on specific training, internship and experience prerequisites, testing; verifiable recommendations, and payment of prevailing testing and certification fees; with each level offering specific rights and privileges that appertain thereto. The four levels of certification and the requirements, rights and privileges appertaining thereto, are as follows:

 

Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I

Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II

Certified Domestic Violence Specialist III

Certified Domestic Violence Specialist IV

 

Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist I

A Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I shall be eligible to serve as a co-facilitator in group therapy, or an assistant in paraprofessional, technical and administrative activities in the field, working under the clinical supervision of a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist IV, and under the direct supervision and direction of a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist II, III or IV.

 

General Requirements:

 

The applicant for certification as a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist I shall certify, and shall upon request be able to verify, that he/she meets the following criteria:

 

Is, and has been for at least two years, free from all substance abuse (including alcohol, illicit drugs, misuse of prescription drugs, and all other psychoactive substances);

 

Is not on probation, parole, or under the sanctions of any child-protective or adult-protective agency, or under other court/judiciary sanctions.

 

Has not been convicted of any felony within the last five years, nor any misdemeanor within the last two years.

 

Is living, and has for at least two years lived, a violence-free life in all relationships.

 

Is, and has been for at least one year, personally accountable to a pastor, priest or chaplain of his/her persuasion and choice; and is submitting as part of his/her application a letter of reference from said Christian member.

 

Educational and Experience Requirements:

 

An applicant for certification as a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist I shall meet or exceed one of the following:

 

Hold a Bachelors degree, from an approved college, university or institute of higher learning, in Domestic Violence Counseling, Marriage & Family Therapy, Addiction Rehabilitation Therapy, Pastoral Care, or other approved curriculum; and have completed the training courses: “Mastery Over Anger”, “Assertiveness & Self-ownership”, and “Codependency to Self-identity” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute.

 

Hold an Associate of Arts or Associates of Sciences Degree, from an approved college, university or institute of higher learning, in a program of study leading toward certification in domestic violence counseling, addiction rehabilitation counseling, pastoral care, or other approved curriculum; have completed the training courses: “Mastery Over Anger”, “Assertiveness & Self-ownership”, “Codependency to Self-identity” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute; and have completed a six month training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Hold a high school diploma or General Education Development certificate; have successfully completed the training courses: “Mastery Over Anger,” “Assertiveness & Self-ownership,” “Codependency to Self-identity” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute; and have completed a one year training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Continuing Education Requirements

 

In addition to fulfilling all prerequisites for initial certification at this level, the applicant shall annually meet the requirements for continuing education, as hereinafter specified.

 

Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist II

 

A Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II shall be eligible to serve as a co-facilitator or facilitator in group therapy, as a conjoint counselor, or an assistant in paraprofessional, technical and administrative activities in the field, working under the clinical supervision of a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist IV, and under the direct supervision and direction of a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist III or IV.

 

General Requirements:

           

The applicant for certification as a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist II shall certify, and shall upon request be able to verify, that he/she meets the following criteria:

 

Is, and has been for at least two years, free from all substance abuse (including alcohol, illicit drugs, misuse of prescription drugs, and all other psychoactive substances);

 

Is not on probation, parole, or under the sanctions of any child-protective or adult-protective agency, or under other court/judiciary sanctions.

 

Has not been convicted of any felony within the last five years, nor any misdemeanor within the last two years.

 

Is living, and has for at least two years lived, a violence-free life in all relationships.

 

Is, and has been for at least one year, personally accountable to a pastor, priest or chaplain of his/her persuasion and choice; and is submitting as part of his/her application a letter of reference from said Christian member.

 

Educational and Experience Requirements:

 

An applicant for certification as a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist II shall meet or exceed one of the following:

 

Hold a Masters degree, from an approved college university, or institute of higher learning, in Domestic Violence Counseling, Marriage & Family Therapy, Addiction Rehabilitation Therapy, Pastoral Care, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: “Arrested-development & Dual-personalities,” “Healing Inner-child Wounds,” and “Toxic Shame & the Journey Out” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Institute and offered through various colleges, universities and institutes of higher learning), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; and have completed a six month training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Hold a Bachelors degree, from an approved college, university, or institute of higher learning, in Domestic Violence Counseling, Marriage & Family Therapy, Addiction Rehabilitation Therapy, Pastoral Care, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: “Arrested-development & Dual-personalities,” “Healing Inner-child Wounds,” and “Toxic Shame & the Journey Out” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; and have completed a one year training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Hold an Associate of Arts or Associates of Sciences Degree, from an approved college, university, or institute of higher learning in a program of study leading toward certification in domestic violence counseling, addiction rehabilitation counseling, pastoral care, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: “Arrested-development & Dual-personalities,” “Healing Inner-child Wounds,” and “Toxic Shame & the Journey Out” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; have completed a one year training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence; and have not less than six months experience serving as a co-facilitator of groups in an anger-managment, domestic violence abatement, batterers intervention, or family abuse victims program.

 

Hold a high school diploma or General Education Development certificate; have successfully completed the training courses: have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: “Arrested-development & Dual-personalities,” “Healing Inner-child Wounds,” and “Toxic Shame & the Journey Out” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; have completed a one year training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence; and have not less than one year experience serving as a co-facilitator of groups in an anger-managment, domestic violence abatement, batterers intervention, or family abuse victims program.

 

 

Continuing Education Requirements

 

In addition to fulfilling all prerequisites for initial certification at this level, the applicant shall annually meet the requirements for continuing education, as hereinafter specified.

 

Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist III

 

A Certified Domestic Violence Specialist III shall be eligible to serve as a facilitator in group therapy, as a conjoint counselor, or an assistant in paraprofessional, technical and administrative activities in the field, and provide direct supervision to Domestic Violence Specialists I and II, while working under the clinical supervision and direct supervision and direction of a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist IV.

 

General Requirements:

 

The applicant for certification as a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist III shall certify, and shall upon request be able to verify, that he/she meets the following criteria:

 

Is, and has been for at least two years, free from all substance abuse (including alcohol, illicit drugs, misuse of prescription drugs, and all other psychoactive substances);

 

Is not on probation, parole, or under the sanctions of any child-protective or adult-protective agency, or under other court/judiciary sanctions.

 

Has not been convicted of any felony within the last five years, nor any misdemeanor within the last two years.

 

Is living, and has for at least two years lived, a violence-free life in all relationships.

 

Is, and has been for at least one year, personally accountable to a pastor, priest or chaplain of his/her persuasion and choice; and is submitting as part of his/her application a letter of reference from said Christian member.

 

Educational and Experience Requirements:

 

An applicant for certification as a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist III shall meet or exceed one of the following:

 

Hold a Doctoral degree from an approved college, university, or institute of higher learning in Psychology, Psychiatry, Pastoral Care, Marriage & Family Therapy, Domestic Violence Counseling, Addiction Rehabilitation Therapy, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II; have completed the training courses: “Adolescence & Beyond: Growing Beyond Our Genetics,” “Bonding vs. Bondage: Keys to Successful Marriages,” and “Positive Parenting” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Institute and offered through various colleges, universities and institutes of higher learning), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; and have not less than one year experience as a administrator, assistant administrator, or facilitator in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Hold a Masters degree, from an approved college university, or institute of higher learning, in Psychology, Premed, Domestic Violence Counseling, Marriage & Family Therapy, Addiction Rehabilitation Therapy, Pastoral Care, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II; have completed the training courses: have completed the training courses: “Adolescence & Beyond: Growing Beyond Our Genetics,” “Bonding vs. Bondage: Keys to Successful Marriages,” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Institute and offered through various colleges, universities and institutes of higher learning), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; has completed a six month and has at least one year post-training experience as a facilitator or co-facilitator in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Hold a Bachelors degree, from an approved college, university, or institute of higher learning, in Domestic Violence Counseling, Marriage & Family Therapy, Addiction Rehabilitation Therapy, Pastoral Care, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II; have completed the training courses: have completed the training courses: “Adolescence & Beyond: Growing Beyond Our Genetics,” “Bonding vs. Bondage: Keys to Successful Marriages,” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; and have completed a one year training and have at least six months experience as a facilitator in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Hold an Associate of Arts or Associates of Sciences Degree, from an approved college, university, or institute of higher learning in a program of study leading toward certification in domestic violence counseling, addiction rehabilitation counseling, pastoral care, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II; have completed the training courses: have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: “have completed the training courses: “Adolescence & Beyond: Growing Beyond Our Genetics,” “Bonding vs. Bondage: Keys to Successful Marriages,” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; have completed a one year training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence; and have not less than one year experience serving as a co-facilitator of groups in an anger-managment, domestic violence abatement, batterers intervention, or family abuse victims program.

 

Hold a high school diploma or General Education Development certificate; have successfully completed the training courses: have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II; have completed the training courses: have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: have completed the training courses: “Adolescence & Beyond: Growing Beyond Our Genetics,” “Bonding vs. Bondage: Keys to Successful Marriages,” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; have completed a one year training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence; and have not less than eighteen months experience serving as a co-facilitator of groups in an anger-managment, domestic violence abatement, batterers intervention, or family abuse victims program.

 

Continuing Education Requirements

           

In addition to fulfilling all prerequisites for initial certification at this level, the applicant shall annually meet the requirements for continuing education, as hereinafter specified.

 

Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist IV

           

A Certified Domestic Violence Specialist IV shall be eligible to serve as an Administrator and Clinical Supervisor, facilitator in group therapy, individual, couple and family counselor, provide client advocacy services, policy and program development and political action services, serve as an educator in the field, and provide direct supervision to Domestic Violence Specialists I, II and III.

 

General Requirements:

           

The applicant for certification as a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist IV shall certify, and shall upon request be able to verify, that he/she meets the following criteria:

 

Is, and has been for at least two years, free from all substance abuse (including alcohol, illicit drugs, misuse of prescription drugs, and all other psychoactive substances);

 

Is not on probation, parole, or under the sanctions of any child-protective or adult-protective agency, or under other court/judiciary sanctions.

 

Has not been convicted of any felony within the last five years, nor any misdemeanor within the last two years.

 

Is living, and has for at least two years lived, a violence-free life in all relationships.

 

Is, and has been for at least one year, personally accountable to a pastor, priest or chaplain of his/her persuasion and choice; and is submitting as part of his/her application a letter of reference from said Christian member.

 

Educational and Experience Requirements:

 

An applicant for certification as a Certified Christian Domestic Violence Specialist IV shall meet or exceed one of the following:

 

Hold a valid State license as a Psychologist, Psychiatrist, Licensed Professional Counselor, or Marriage & Family Therapist, or valid license as an ordained member of the clergy; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist III; have completed the training courses: “Soul Care & Psychospiritual Counseling,” “Counseling Addicts & Offenders: A Guide to Criminal Justice Counseling,” and “Clinical Supervision in Criminal Justice Counseling”  (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Institute and offered through various colleges, universities and institutes of higher learning), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; and have not less than one year experience as a administrator, assistant administrator, or facilitator in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

                       

Hold a Doctoral degree from an approved college, university, or institute of higher learning in Psychology, Psychiatry, Pastoral Care, Marriage & Family Therapy, Domestic Violence Counseling, Addiction Rehabilitation Therapy, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist III; have completed the training courses: “Soul Care & Psychospiritual Counseling,” “Counseling Addicts & Offenders: A Guide to Criminal Justice Counseling,” and “Clinical Supervision in Criminal Justice Counseling” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Institute and offered through various colleges, universities and institutes of higher learning), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; and have not less than one year experience as a administrator, assistant administrator, or facilitator in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Hold a Masters degree, from an approved college university, or institute of higher learning, in Psychology, Premed, Domestic Violence Counseling, Marriage & Family Therapy, Addiction Rehabilitation Therapy, Pastoral Care, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist III; have completed the training courses: have completed the training courses: “Soul Care & Psychospiritual Counseling,” “Counseling Addicts & Offenders: A Guide to Criminal Justice Counseling,” and “Clinical Supervision in Criminal Justice Counseling” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Institute and offered through various colleges, universities and institutes of higher learning), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; has completed a one year training, and has at least two year post-training experience as an assistant director or facilitator in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Hold a Bachelors degree, from an approved college, university, or institute of higher learning, in Domestic Violence Counseling, Marriage & Family Therapy, Addiction Rehabilitation Therapy, Pastoral Care, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II; have completed the training courses: have completed the training courses: “Soul Care & Psychospiritual Counseling,” “Counseling Addicts & Offenders: A Guide to Criminal Justice Counseling,” and “Clinical Supervision in Criminal Justice Counseling” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; and have completed a one year training and have at least three years experience as a facilitator in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence.

 

Hold an Associate of Arts or Associates of Sciences Degree, from an approved college, university, or institute of higher learning in a program of study leading toward certification in domestic violence counseling, addiction rehabilitation counseling, pastoral care, or other approved curriculum; have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II; have completed the training courses: have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: “have completed the training courses: “Soul Care & Psychospiritual Counseling,” “Counseling Addicts & Offenders: A Guide to Criminal Justice Counseling,” and “Clinical Supervision in Criminal Justice Counseling” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; have completed a one year training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence; and have not less than four years experience serving as an assistant administrator, facilitator, or co-facilitator of groups in an anger-managment, domestic violence abatement, batterers intervention, or family abuse victims program.

 

Hold a high school diploma or General Education Development certificate; have successfully completed the training courses: have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist II; have completed the training courses: have completed all prerequisites for certification as a Certified Domestic Violence Specialist I; have completed the training courses: have completed the training courses: “Soul Care & Psychospiritual Counseling,” “Counseling Addicts & Offenders: A Guide to Criminal Justice Counseling,” and “Clinical Supervision in Criminal Justice Counseling” (developed by Jubilee Enterprises, d.b.a. AFS Family Skills Training Institute and offered through various colleges and universities), or courses equal thereto and approved by the AFS Family Skills Institute Board; have completed a one year training in a program providing direct client services to perpetrators and/or victims of family abuse and domestic violence; and have not less five years experience serving as an assistant administrator, a counselor, facilitator or co-facilitator of groups in an anger-managment, domestic violence abatement, batterers intervention, or family abuse victims program.

 

Continuing Education Requirements

 

In addition to fulfilling all prerequisites for initial certification at this level, the applicant shall annually meet the requirements for continuing education, as hereinafter specified.

 

Certification Renewals

           

Certification is valid for one year from the date of issuance. Each certificate holder will receive a renewal notification not less than thirty (30) days prior to the expiration date of their certificate. Certification renewal shall require substantiation that applicant has acquired thirty (30) or more renewal credits per year, which shall be computed as follows:

 

Current membership in AACT                                                                   05

Full-time employment in the field                                                              10

Part-time employment (not less than 20 hrs. Per week)                            05

College studies, per semester credit                                                           05

Save Our Families training, per course                                                     15

Continuing Education, per contact hour                                                   01

Published Professional Paper                                                                    10

 

Prevailing Testing Certification Fees  (Effective 01/01/2005)

Note: Testing fees will be waived for individuals who have successfully completed the requisite AFS Family Skills Training for the level of certification sought, in view of the fact that the completion of said courses incorporates this testing.

           

Certification            Description           Testing          Initial            Renewal

Level                                                 Fee                              Certification            

 

     I                             CDVS-I               $150.00        $119.00          $109.00

 

     II                            CDVS-II              $150.00        $129.00          $119.00

 

     III                           CDVS-III            $150.00         $139.00          $129.00

 

     IV                          CDVS-IV             $150.00         $159.00         $149.00